Keynote Speakers

Thomas Quaade Bandholm

Thomas Quaade Bandholm

University of Copenhagen

Exercise therapy to enhance recovery after orthopedic surgery: what, why and how

The talk will focus on the ability of exercise therapy to enhance recovery after major orthopaedic surgery. Emphasis will be put on progressive resistance exercise because it has the potential to restore disused or surgery-induced loss of muscle strength and functional performance. The talk will address the “what”, “why” and “how” of progressive resistance exercise to enhance recovery after surgery: What is it? Why would one use it? How would one use it? and Does it matter to patients?

Silvia Blemker

Silvia Blemker

University of Virginia

Multi-scale computer modeling for treatment discovery in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Skeletal muscles are extraordinarily adapted motors that enable us to perform many important functions, from walking to sight to speech.  Thus, muscle dysfunction arising from muscle atrophy, degeneration, fatty infiltration, and fibrosis present major health care problems. From a basic science perspective, we have a sophisticated understanding of the fundamental biology and mechanics of skeletal muscle.  However, how these fundamentals relate to in vivo function and whole muscle adaptation is complex and remains poorly understood, which limits the translation of basic biological understanding to the development of effective treatments for muscle disease.  The goal of my lab is to overcome this challenge by developing and validating multi-scale computational models of skeletal muscle that allow us to relate structure, biology, and function across a range of scales. In this presentation, I will describe these approaches and present some recent examples of how computational models of muscle have led to new ideas and insights into the mechanisms and treatments for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

Anthony Bull

Anthony Bull

Imperial College London

Developing and using musculoskeletal models to quantify capacity, reserve and compensation

Investment and development in musculoskeletal modelling has been extensive and deep over the past three decades, yet there has been very little application of this in the clinical environment. Where “clinician-friendly” models is the focus for some developers, there remains an unexplored horizon of clinical use of the more advanced models. In this talk Anthony will present a combined advanced clinical and modelling framework to assess biomechanical function and then give examples of its use in ageing and musculoskeletal trauma.